What is Phonics? Extra Information

What is phonics?

 

Phonics is a way of teaching children to read quickly and skilfully. They are taught how to recognise the sounds that each individual letter makes, identify the sounds that different combinations of letters make - such as ‘sh’ or ‘oo’; and blend these sounds together from left to right to make a word.

Download the video below to hear how these sounds are pronounced:

Phonics Pronounciation

Children can then use this knowledge to ‘de-code’ new words that they hear or see. This is the first important step in learning to read.

 

Why phonics?

Research shows that when phonics is taught in a structured way - starting with the easiest sounds and progressing through to the most complex – it is the most effective way of teaching young children to read. 

Almost all children who receive good teaching of phonics will learn the skills they need to tackle new words. They can then go on to read any kind of text fluently and confidently, and to read for enjoyment.

Children who have been taught phonics also tend to read more accurately than those taught using other methods, such as ‘look and say’. This includes children who find learning to read difficult, for example those who have dyslexia.

If you would like to find out more about phonics, visit: 

Government advice on phonics

There are six overlapping phases. The table below is a summary:

 

Phase

Phonic Knowledge and Skills

Phase One (Pre-School)

Activities are divided into seven aspects, including environmental sounds, instrumental sounds, body sounds, rhythm and rhyme, alliteration, voice sounds and finally oral blending and segmenting.

Phase Two

Learning 19 letters of the alphabet and one sound for each. Blending sounds together to make words. Segmenting words into their separate sounds. Beginning to read simple captions.

Be able to read 6 tricky words...the, to, I, no, go, into

Phase Three

The remaining 7 letters of the alphabet, one sound for each. Graphemes such as ch, oo, th representing the remaining phonemes not covered by single letters. Reading captions, sentences and questions. On completion of this phase, children will have learnt the "simple code", i.e. one grapheme for each phoneme in the English language.

Be able to read 12 tricky words...he, she, we, me, be, was, my, you, her, they, all are

Be able to spell the 6 tricky words from Phase 2

Phase Four

No new grapheme-phoneme correspondences are taught in this phase. Children learn to blend and segment longer words with adjacent consonants, e.g. swim, clap, jump.

Be able to spell 14 more tricky words...some, come, one, said, do, so, were, when, have, there, out, like, little, what

Be able to spell the Phase 3 words

Phase Five

Now we move on to the "complex code". Children learn more graphemes for the phonemes which they already know, plus different ways of pronouncing the graphemes they already know.

Be able to read and write the First 100 Common Exception Words...

the

and

a

to

said

in

he

I

of

it

was

you

they

on

she

is

for

at

his

but

that

with

all

we

can

are

up

had

my

her

what

there

out

this

have

went

be

like

some

so

not

then

were

go

little

as

no

mum

one

them

do

me

down

dad

big

when

it's

see

looked

very

look

don't

come

will

into

back

from

children

him

Mr

get

just

now

came

oh

about

got

their

people

your

put

could

house

old

too

by

day

made

time

I'm

if

help

Mrs

called

here

off

asked

saw

make

an

Phase Six

Working on spelling, including prefixes and suffixes, doubling and dropping letters, etc.

Read and write the next 200 common words...

Image result for next 200 high frequency words in order

 And remember, please talk to your child’s teacher if you would like to find out more.

Other Useful Websites:

http://www.mrthorne.com/

http://www.oxfordowl.co.uk/for-home/reading-owl/reading

http://www.phonicsplay.co.uk/ParentsMenu.htm